Drupal News

Scott Hadfield: Drupal community member interviews with Acquia. You won't believe what happens next!

Planet Drupal - Fri, 18/04/2014 - 1:55am
With apologies to webchick for ripping her brilliant headline ;-) The background:

At the end of 2013 I started to think about where I currently am work-wise, and what I enjoy and want to do with myself now. My drupal-based startup Hello Pretty has been growing at a fantastic rate, and is also self sustaining enough now that I can step away without harming it. We've built it with an ideal of keeping things technically as simple as possible and rather focusing our money & energy on marketing.

In my job at NowPublic I managed the dev team (rather than doing any programming myself. After 20 years of it I've started to get a bit bored). I loved that job and decided that I'd like to get back into that.

In January I began the process of looking for jobs. This would most likely have meant leaving our beautiful home in Cape Town and moving to where the work was. So it was no small decision for Sam and I.

At the end of February two very cool companies for positions I hadn't applied to contacted me two days apart, both through word-of-mouth references from people I've worked with previously. After a handful of rejections in the process already, I was ecstatic. One was in one of my favourite cities in the world, Vancouver :), and the other - Acquia - I've followed since day one of it's existence and have several friends and former colleagues who work there.

After chatting to the company in Vancouver a couple of times, they were quite keen and waiting to hear back on where I stood.

As I write this I keep thinking back to one of my favourite quotes and wondering why I didn't heed this advice sooner. It refers to a person's character or nature, and that how they handle anything small or 'unimportant' most likely reflects how they handle everything big or important.

 

My Acquia Story

 

Note: I don't blame any individual for my experience, but rather a culture within the company. Any names of the people who I spoke to have been changed.

Week 1

Matt from Acquia and I chatted on Skype video for about an hour. He was the person most involved in hiring me, and making a final call. We discussed my skills and qualifications, my salary expectations, and the fact that I had another company waiting for a response from me. He was keen to chat more and would try to keep the process quick so that I didn't have to keep the Vancouver company waiting long. He asked whether I'd be ok to have interviews over the next week. I agreed and said I'd explain the situation to the other company. After those were done there'd still be the meetings with the CEO and CTO of Acquia. He couldn't promise that it would be easy to schedule with them, so there could be additional delays.

This was on Wednesday morning Boston-time.

Week 2

By the following Monday at mid day, 6 days later, I still hadn't heard from them and assumed that he'd changed his mind. Not a big deal. But then, a recruiter from Acquia finally emailed me to schedule some interviews. Yay!

I sent back my schedule and... nothing. I understood from friends that Acquia usually want a few interviews, and the week was quickly coming to an end.

I followed up with the recruiter explaining that there was some urgency and that I didn't want to keep the Vancouver company waiting - I'd already put them off for a full week at this point. In the interest of expediting the process I offered to rearrange my own schedule or meet at short notice. I also asked for a sense of Acquia's timeline.

The recruiter promptly responded by setting up 4 interviews over the next two days. Three of them after 8pm my time, and one of them scheduled from 11:30pm to 12:30am. Ok, I figured, people are busy, and if this was going to get things done sooner, then great. Besides, this would give me bragging rights for having had a job interview at midnight.

After those 4 interviews I was asked to review the product I'd be working with to provide feedback, suggestions, etc. which I did over the weekend. I spent a few hours figuring it out, and working on my review. Obviously I wanted to impress, and the feedback I got from them (on my feedback) was very positive. I was actually really impressed with what I saw. Acquia is doing a lot of very cool stuff that I'd had no idea about.

Week 3

I had now kept the company in Vancouver waiting considerably longer than I'd told them I would. I hate keeping people waiting, in any context, and if I tell someone I'm going to do anything by a certain date or time it's important to me to stick to it. That goes for work and personal commitments.

On Monday (day 13) I'd again had no word. I followed up on Tuesday. "Interviews would be scheduled shortly". Matt asked if it would be ok to do this on very short notice and how late I could meet. Keen to wrap things up, I agreed to meet at any time.

After those next two interviews, radio silence. Matt said he'd "touch base to follow up with next steps". And then more radio silence. Two days later he got back to me to say he was having the recruiter set up more interviews. And sure enough, on Friday that week the recruiter mailed me to arrange a few more interviews.

This was when I started feeling demoralized. Why had they only scheduled two interviews in the entire week when I'd made my schedule completely open to them? Why did they continue to schedule interviews after 8pm for me (that's after 2pm Boston-time) if they were only going to schedule two or three in a week? I knew there was one other candidate, I had no idea where I stood, and it was never communicated to me how many more interviews there might be. I'd made my schedule very flexible for Acquia, and I'd pushed back my other job to the point where I was being straight-up disrespectful to them.

I decided to get back to the guys in Vancouver and figure out next-steps with them.

I've interviewed for jobs in the past, and I've interviewed people for jobs. I'm quite familiar with the "normal" process from both ends. Never had I been involved in, or even heard of, had such a long, stretched out and uncomfortably bureaucratic process. I hardly expected it from a company who claims to want to move quickly, and one who I hadn't applied to, but had actually approached me in the first instance. This is a company whose CEO subscribes to a philosophy of Ready, Fire, Aim. I'm of the opinion that, if you can't make a decision after 4 interviews... DO NOT HIRE. It's a sign that something's wrong, maybe just a gut feeling, but something worth listening to. I'd had 7 interviews by now, with 3 more scheduled for the following week.

I began seriously questioning whether I could work for a company with such bureaucratic, non-transparent and slow processes. Was this how things operate internally too? It was hard for me to believe that they could have a hiring process like this and still function acceptably within the rest of the company. But, I have a lot of friends who work for Acquia and they all seem to really enjoy working there.

The recruiter asked for times early the following week, so I again opened up my entire schedule including late night interviews. For anyone who's never done a late night interview, I'll tell you right now that they're extremely challenging. After a full day of work (I've been putting in 10 to 12 hour days), after hanging out, eating dinner, it's time to snap out of it and get ready. Get out of your PJs, put on a nice shirt, and get focussed. It's always important to be on top of your game in any interview. This means being wide awake and involves adrenaline.

 

The interviews themselves are always intense. Almost always enjoyable for me too, since I love chatting with interesting people (and everyone I spoke to at Acquia was interesting). Regardless, if my interview ends at 11pm, I won't be getting to sleep before 2am at the absolute earliest. This means a slow day to follow it up. Of course I had no idea that this would be the case when I first started agreeing to these, and I also thought I'd be looking at 7 days of it, not at least 3 weeks of it (at the end of which I still didn't have any clue as to when it would all end).

Week 4

My meetings for the week were set up, the final one being at 9pm on Friday. The first interview of the week was with Matt again. I'd hoped to get a chance to get clarity on the process, but no dice. I was caught a bit off guard as he grilled me again on things we'd already discussed in our first and second interviews, and that were brought up by the developers I spoke to in week 3. I had another interview immediately after that which was probably my favourite of the bunch but at the end of it all I was left feeling very disheartened with no idea what was going on.

While I was moving forward with the Vancouver company, all of this was still upsetting. I was under the impression when they contacted me that this would take a week, and it had now been dragged out over 4 (with no end in sight). Had I known up front that they required 10-12 interviews I'd have turned them down immediately and saved everybody a lot of time.

Through all this, and despite feeling the way I did, everyone at Acquia seemed very smart and like people I'd have really enjoyed working with. I felt I had a great vibe with Matt and even if this didn't work out, every one of the team would have been a person I'd have enjoyed having a beer with next time I was in Boston.

This is why the response I received the following Monday was so shocking.

Week 5

 

Hi Scott,

Thank you for taking the time to interview with us for our Director, Acquia {DIVISION HIDDEN} opening. Our team has had a chance to discuss your qualifications, and unfortunately, I have decided to pursue other candidates who appear to match (skills and experience) our requirements more closely at this time.

Should something change on our side (or I get another job opening that matches your background better), I will not hesitate to contact you.

Thank you again for your interest in an employment opportunity with Acquia, Inc., and I wish you the best of luck in your current job search.

Thanks,
[Recruiter's Name]

I was in shocked disbelief. Not because I was turned down for the job though: I had in fact received this identical message two months earlier when I applied for an unrelated position at Acquia. They'd looked at my resume and turned me away without any interviews. And now, after:

  • 3 interviews with Matt,
  • a lot of back and forth emails discussing the company and position,
  • a couple of hours spent reviewing and reporting on the project I'd be managing,
  • 4 weeks, and
  • 10 interviews, with
  • 8 people...

... I got a template rejection? And not even from Matt himself, but from the recruiter he delegated it to.

It took a full day of thinking to figure out whether I was upset because I didn't get the job, or because I'd been treated in such a disrespectful way. I'd believed that I'd had a great vibe with Matt, and that the task of sending me my template rejection had been delegated to a recruiter was insulting.

I'll be honest, I was so furious that first day that I considered working for one of their competitors with the sole purpose of taking them down. The next day after I'd got my head back on straight I realized that that would be a strange focus to put on my life for at least the next decade. I spoke to a friend at Acquia and asked if he thought this (the process, not my malicious aspirations) was normal. He couldn't believe my story, and promptly spoke to Matt about what had happened.

I don't think Matt realized I'd be getting a template response, and after learning so from my friend he quickly sent me an apology mail for it. While his mail explicitly said "Either way, no excuses", it was still surprisingly full of excuses (such as being too swamped).

Now, for all I know Matt wanted to send me a long detailed response or call me to explain everything but really was too swamped to. However, considering that he knew I was under pressure with another company and availed myself for what turned out to be a 10-interview gauntlet, a quick 2-liner explaining that I was rejected and setting up a call would have been appreciated.

 

The Moral

I feel that my quote here applies firmly. When you start seeing red flags like a company taking advantage of a person's offer of flexibility (or anything else), unnecessary bureaucracy, and a lack of transparency, it's probably time to call it a day and cut off communication with them (unless you work well in that environment). After the way I felt during the whole process, should I really have been surprised with the way my rejection was handled?

Nobody, whether applying to a position as a CEO or a janitor, should be treated with such discourtesy by the company interviewing them.

 

For Acquia:

Despite dealing more with Matt than anyone else, I certainly don't put the full blame on him. I believe that what happened here is the result of culture and attitude within Acquia.

You have a CEO who contradictorily states that he won't hire anyone with a Ready Aim Fire mentality. Acquia's hiring process is exactly that. Dries (the CTO) says he wants Acquia to do well and good such as acting as a driver to build up and support the Drupal community, yet at the same time the company is treating job candidates (many from within that same community) extraordinarily disrespectfully.

To those at Acquia who are in a position where they can make positive change: it's time you look at your processes and question them. Another friend at Acquia told me that the HR and hiring process is something you're proud of. If you happen to read this post and you're proud of the actions taken, well, I appreciate the rejection.

I'm almost certainly not an isolated case. Much of the Acquia team is made up of loyal members of the Drupal community, and I'd guess that a large percentage of the applicants are community members too (myself included).

Categories: Drupal News

Frederick Giasson: Configuring and Using OSF Entities (Screencast)

Planet Drupal - Thu, 17/04/2014 - 11:29pm

This screencalcast introduces you to one of the most important OSF for Drupal connector: the OSF Entities module. This module creates a new Entity Type called Resource. The description of these entities is managed directly into the Open Semantic Framework (OSF). All the calls to the core entity API function like: entity_load(), entity_save(), entity_create() and entity_delete() are operated with different calls to different OSF web service endpoints.

What this means for a Drupal developer is that they can use Drupal’s Entity API to manage instance records that are hosted remotely in a OSF instance. They don’t have to know how OSF works in order to take advantage of it. They just have to use the API they are used to use. This new Entity Type supports the following Drupal features:

  1. Full Entity API
  2. Entities caching
  3. Revisioning
  4. SearchAPI
  5. Templates selection with inference on their type
  6. 29 field widgets
  7. Export feature in 6 formats

The screencast introduces you to the following aspects of the OSF Entities module:

  1. Introduction to the architecture of the OSF Entities module
  2. Exposing the available entities in OSF into Drupal Bundles and Fields
  3. Browsing and searching for Resource entities
  4. Managing Resource Type bundles
  5. Introduction to the OSF Entity Reference field widget
  6. Creating and updating Resource entities

 



Categories: Drupal News

Amazee Labs: Logfile Handling - Are you visualizing your Logfiles?

Planet Drupal - Thu, 17/04/2014 - 8:23pm

We are crazy about graphs and statistics. No wonder we also want to get a feel for the health of our Drupal sites in some way. On our video wall, one screen is dedicated to showing us errors per server to get a better understanding for how good we are doing. You cannot reach zero here, but you see if something fails miserably when things go over 9,000!

We can use our logging information for several things - visualizing error messages is just one use case. As an example, we store the generated data a bit longer to audit some processes, for example, content modification or deletion which is logged by the content module. However, let's jump in!

Architecture

Our setup is currently pretty simple. The so called Elasticsearch ELK Stack (ELK stands for Elasticsearch Logstash Kibana) provides many more possibilities to setup for scalability. For our current size and needs we are happy with the way we set it up. It is straight forward and empowers us to make use of the data that is otherwise stored in the Drupal databases mostly unnoticed.

Drupal - Syslog Module

We make use of the Syslog functionality within Drupal to ship the Syslogs to our Local 7 endpoint of Syslog. From there, the messages are passed to Logstash.

Enabling Syslog is a straightforward thing:

drush en syslog drush vset syslog_identity yoursite_com drush vset syslog_facility 184 drush dis dblog

The remaining settings are left default, but you can change the information that is logged to your needs.

Logstash

Logstash, written by Jordan Sissel, is the Swiss Army knife in our setup. You can think of it as Multiple Input - Multiple Output System. It features many In and Output Types (check the documentation section of the Logstash website for more information). We use the Syslog listener of Logstash and feed this data into our Elasticsearch instance. We create a new index every day to ease the process with retaining the logfiles. The current setup does not need further separation to this, Logstash allows us to split up the messages passed along from Drupal into separate searchable fields. For example, we split the site name, username, module, severity into separated fields.

Elasticsearch

All log entries are passed on from Logstash to Elasticsearch for indexing, search and storage. Elasticsearch is a quite young but powerful tool. It handles sharding and replication over many nodes with ease and has fantastic performance in searching.

Kibana

Kibana is the frontend to Elasticsearch. It allows you to query the data stored within Elasticsearch and displays this information in graphs, diagrams tailored to your needs. We have several graphs we use daily. For example, we show all exceptions thrown on our video wall to see when something goes down. A sudden change in quantity of the errors gives us a hint to look into it. We also go trough the errors after deployments to ensure no fatal exceptions happen and are able to fix things that wouldn't be noticed otherwise.

Want to hear more?

Got curious to see what you can achieve with those tools? I'll is speaking at Campus Berne on 22. April 2014 - You can register yourself on TechUp.

Stay in the loop – join our newsletter!  

 

Categories: Drupal News

Phase2: Contemplating the Benefits of Open Source with Metal Toad Media

Planet Drupal - Thu, 17/04/2014 - 8:27am

Last week, I made the journey from Washington, D.C., to our new Portland office, or the “Front End Development Capital of Phase2,” as I like to call it. It was an incredibly enjoyable and productive trip, including everything from hanging out with the awesome West Coast Phase2 crew to discussing our vision for growth in Portland over the coming months and years.

While in Portland, I had the pleasure of sharing some great local beer and stimulating conversation at Metal Toad Media headquarters. During an hour-long podcast that provoked many insightful comments and questions, our host Joaquin Lippincott, Metal Toad’s president, led me, Jacob Redding, and David Bellous through a discussion on the merits of open source vs. closed source technologies.

Joaquin got the ball rolling with the aggressive statement that all closed source technology should be torn down and rebuilt with an open source counterpart. Despite each participant’s shared passion for open source, David was cautious about agreeing to such a sweeping declaration, arguing that with enough time and money it is possible to solve any problem with any technology. He placed greater emphasis on finding the tool best suited to a company’s unique cultural ecosystem and specific technical objectives. My take: I fully agree that each situation requires a creative approach to selecting the right tool for the job, taking into account culture, budget, and goals. In my opinion, there are increasingly less times today when a closed source solution is the right fit.

The discussion turned to the issue of sunk costs and opportunity costs. In the context of what Joaquin deemed the “unmitigated disaster” of Oregon’s online healthcare exchange, which was implemented by Oracle, we debated the increasingly outdated perspective that paying more for software automatically translates to better results. I used Microsoft’s collaborative software SharePoint as an example of a widely purchased product with mediocre if not downright poor customer satisfaction. However, when a massive investment is made (like Oregon’s $132 million in CoverOregon), it is difficult for a government or business to cut its losses and start over, no matter how much additional money it stands to lose in the long run.

Innovation, and the process by which open and closed organizations arrive at it, was another fascinating topic of conversation. Jacob pointed out that while Oracle’s annual investment of $5 million in research and development is easy to grasp, the constant aggregated innovation produced by the open source community is a less tangible concept – but no less meaningful. Most of us acknowledged the merits of a defined road map for innovation, which is usually more visible from proprietary companies, but agreed that collaborative methods of development are being embraced by closed and open source organizations alike. It’s a trend that is really exciting for me personally: more companies are losing their “F.U.D.” (fear, uncertainty, and doubt) about releasing long-kept “secret” code and embracing the clear advantages of open collaboration.

Although Joaquin, Jacob, David, and I covered many other issues, including the advantages of open methodology and the importance of properly executed implementation regardless of the technology, I feel that we’ve only covered the tip of the iceberg in the open vs. closed debate. Altogether it was an extremely enjoyable afternoon (beers included!). Check out the recording at Metal Toad Media, and let me know your thoughts on our discussion. I’d love to hear others weigh in and continue the debate here!

Categories: Drupal News

Metal Toad: Toadcast 22

Planet Drupal - Thu, 17/04/2014 - 7:38am



Toadcast 22 hosted an All-Star cast including: Dave Bellous co-owner of Yellow Pencil, Jacob Redding Open Source Manager at Accenture's Emerging Technology Innovation Labs, Jeff Walpole CEO of Phase2, & Joaquin Lippincott President of Metal Toad Media to discuss Open Source, Oracle, and and the healthcare web-tech industry (Cover Oregon).

Categories: Drupal News

Drupal.org frontpage posts for the Drupal planet: Drupal 7.27 and 6.31 released

Planet Drupal - Thu, 17/04/2014 - 6:59am

Drupal 7.27 and Drupal 6.31, maintenance releases which contain fixes for security vulnerabilities, are now available for download. See the Drupal 7.27 and Drupal 6.31 release notes for further information.

Download Drupal 7.27
Download Drupal 6.31

Upgrading your existing Drupal 7 and 6 sites is strongly recommended. There are no new features or non-security-related bug fixes in these releases. For more information about the Drupal 7.x release series, consult the Drupal 7.0 release announcement. More information on the Drupal 6.x release series can be found in the Drupal 6.0 release announcement.

Security information

We have a security announcement mailing list and a history of all security advisories, as well as an RSS feed with the most recent security advisories. We strongly advise Drupal administrators to sign up for the list.

Drupal 7 and 6 include the built-in Update Status module (renamed to Update Manager in Drupal 7), which informs you about important updates to your modules and themes.

Bug reports

Both Drupal 7.x and 6.x are being maintained, so given enough bug fixes (not just bug reports) more maintenance releases will be made available, according to our monthly release cycle.

Changelog

Drupal 7.27 is a security release only. For more details, see the 7.27 release notes. A complete list of all bug fixes in the stable 7.x branch can be found in the git commit log.

Drupal 6.31 is a security release only. For more details, see the 6.31 release notes. A complete list of all bug fixes in the stable 6.x branch can be found in the git commit log.

Security vulnerabilities

Drupal 7.27 and 6.31 were released in response to the discovery of security vulnerabilities. Details can be found in the official security advisory:

To fix the security problem, please upgrade to either Drupal 7.27 or Drupal 6.31.

Known issues

This security release introduces small API changes which may require code updates on sites that expose Ajax or multi-step forms to anonymous users, and where the forms are displayed on pages that are cached (either by Drupal or by an external system). See the Drupal 7.27 release notes and Drupal 6.31 release notes for more information.

Front page news: Planet DrupalDrupal version: Drupal 6.xDrupal 7.x
Categories: Drupal News

Appnovation Technologies: Acquia Cloud Reduces Challenges for Media and Entertainment

Planet Drupal - Thu, 17/04/2014 - 6:06am
Acquia Cloud is a powerful platform for developing and deploying Drupal sites. This post discusses how the Acquia Cloud can reduce website challenges experienced by the Media and Entertainment industries. var switchTo5x = false;stLight.options({"publisher":"dr-75626d0b-d9b4-2fdb-6d29-1a20f61d683"});
Categories: Drupal News

AGLOBALWAY: Quick Way To integrate Animate.css in to LESS

Planet Drupal - Thu, 17/04/2014 - 5:38am

Recently I was working in a project, that required some nice predefined css3 animation on different elements. I was wondering if I could achieve it without using javascript and do it fast. Here how I did it:

A quick way to use LESS pre-process and animate.css functionality to make your frontend nice and smoothly animated without any javascript involved.

  1. Download animate.css in to you project/less folder and change file extension to .less
    Your structure should look something like this: project/ ├── less/ │ ├── style.less │ ├── animate.less │ └── overrides.less └── css/ └── style.css
  2. Import animate.less to your main style file. // libraries @import "animate.less"; // core @import "overrides.less";
  3. Edit overrides.less to apply animations on your elements. <h1 class="spetialHeader">Hover Me</h1> h1{ &.spetialHeader{ .animated(); &:hover,&:focus{ .fadeInUp(); } } }
  4. Less preprocess will make the magic and create css file
Tags: Animate.cssdrupal planet
Categories: Drupal News

NYC Camp News & Announcements: Holly Ross Becomes 2014th Contributor to Drupal 8 at NYC Camp 2014

Planet Drupal - Thu, 17/04/2014 - 4:47am

Making good on a long stranding promise with webchick, the DA's Holly Ross rolled her first patch, and inadvertently became the 2014th contributor to Drupal 8 at NYC Camp 2014!

NYC Camp 2014 ended with a bang that perfectly *put a bird* on what was a really tremendous 14th event put on by the NYC Drupal community. Sunday was the final day on which everyone is encouraged to come back and sprint on Drupal code or a project they are working on or to get started contributing with help from a Drupal mentor.  Just over 120 attendees came back for Sprints Day, coordinated by  Irene MeiselCathy Theys & Fureigh

And we had a very special attendee who with just such mentoring was able to make her first contribution. On Saturday during their panel discussion at the United Nations with UN CITO Atti Riazi, Drupal 7 co-maintainer Angie "webchick" Byron and Drupal Association executive director Holly Ross reaffirmed their vow that webchick would help her commit her first patch to Drupal 8, and set a date of the next day (the last day of the camp which was given over to NYC Camp sprinting.)

Also on Saturday at NYC Camp, Alina Mackenzie had discovered an issue in the multiligual system documentation, where the language manager interface docblock was returning implementation details (methods should never return implementation details; it belongs to the implementation to do that.)

As Holly was going through the issue queue to pick something to work on, she came across this one, which since it affects the Drupal's Multilingual system was perfect for the United Nations,  which is preparing to become the largest multilingual Drupal deployment in the world.  Alina had a proposed resolution, so with a little mentoring from Cathy Theys, Holly rolled her 1st patch, which passed SimpleTest. 

However SimpleTest couldn't catch another inline comment on the sort method itself which also contained implementation details, that tstoeckler noticed when he was reviewing Holly's patch.  A temporary setback, Holly quickly rolled a 2nd patch, and even included an interdiff. That was enough to satisfy tsoeckler and he marked the new patch RTBC. 

YesCT also added her RTBC (though not before noticing a bug in d.o. node ownership when the node is edited by and admin) and webchick commited the patch at 5:00 pm, and thus at the exact end of NYC Camp.

It was then that everyone noticed an amazing coincidence. Holly had just become the 2014th contributor to Drupal 8. At NYC Camp 2014.

Uncanny. Check out video of the moment on Drupal TV

Stay tuned for more highlights from NYC Camp 2014

Categories: Drupal News

Drupal core announcements: Migrate in core weekly calls resume

Planet Drupal - Thu, 17/04/2014 - 3:22am
Start:  2014-04-17 15:00 - 15:30 America/Vancouver Online meeting (eg. IRC meeting) Event url: 

https://plus.google.com/106269343178096590461/

After a month hiatus, at a new timeslot we resume our weekly Migrate in core Google Hangouts, focusing on Drupal 7.

The time is 3PM in Vancouver, 6PM in Boston, midnight in Europe (sorry) and 6AM in Perth -- coordinating across this many timezones was very hard and Europe got the short stick. Sorry.

Categories: Drupal News

Stanford Web Services Blog: 3 Tips for Making Your Drupal Features Highly Reusable

Planet Drupal - Thu, 17/04/2014 - 2:00am

Dear Developers, if you follow these simple guidelines, your Drupal Features will be much more useful to institutions like Stanford over time. You will win friends and influence people. Drupal will live up to its potential, and there will be much rejoicing.

Categories: Drupal News

Drupal Association News: How Drupal and Open Source are Helping Youth Rise from Poverty in Africa

Planet Drupal - Thu, 17/04/2014 - 1:43am

The rise of open source, and the skyrocketing popularity of Drupal as a CMS, has made for many very happy developers working in the open source world. But for some people, it isn’t just a hobby or a way to bring home a paycheck: it’s a ticket out of crushing poverty.

Categories: Drupal News

Frederick Giasson: Managing Datasets in OSF for Drupal (Screencast)

Planet Drupal - Thu, 17/04/2014 - 12:14am

In this new screencast, I first introduce the concept of a dataset: what it is, what it is used for and how it works. I will also outline the characteristics of datasets in the Open Semantic Framework (OSF) such as having a set of permissions for group of users, a unique identifier, etc.

Then I explain how datasets are being used by OSF for Drupal, and how they can be managed using a Drupal portal: how to import, create, register, change permissions to datasets. Then I explain how datasets can become searchable using the SearchAPI or be disabled in the web portal.

Finally I cover the OSF Entities administrators search and browse utility which can be used by Drupal administrators to browse and search for all entities that are accessible to the Drupal portal: even the ones that are indexed in datasets that are not yet registered to the portal.

 


Categories: Drupal News

NYC Camp News & Announcements: NYC Camp At The United Nations!

Planet Drupal - Wed, 16/04/2014 - 7:11pm

NYC Camp ("nice camp") is an annual conference featuring talks, industry summits and code sprinting all aimed at accelerated learning and contributing to Drupal and related open source projects."

This year NYC Camp 2014 is being held The United Nations April 10th-13th.

Categories: Drupal News

NYC Camp News & Announcements: Announcing NYC Camp 2014

Planet Drupal - Wed, 16/04/2014 - 7:11pm

NYC Camp (aka 'nice camp') is an annual 4 day mini Drupal conference held in NYC dedicated to Drupal learning and contribution. Best of all it's completely free and volunteer powered! This past year we had a spectacular event packed with trainings, sessions, summits and sprints. We've got a great event in the works and expect NYC Camp 2014 to rock even harder than last year!

Interested in volunteering? Yes You! Sign up to participate and contribute to your NYC Drupal community here

Stay up to date on all upcoming NYCCamp News by following us on twitter @NYCCampDrupal

Categories: Drupal News

Jeremy Epstein: The cost of building a "perfect" custom Drupal installation profile

Planet Drupal - Wed, 16/04/2014 - 5:54pm

With virtually everything in Drupal, there are two ways to accomplish a task: The Easy Way, or The Right™ Way.

Deploying a new Drupal site for the first time is no exception. The Easy Way – and almost certainly the most common way – is to simply copy your local version of the database to production (or staging), along with user-uploaded files. (Your code needs to be deployed too, and The Right™ Way to deploy it is with version-control, which you're hopefully using… but that's another story.)

The Right™ Way to deploy a Drupal site for the first time (at least since Drupal 7, and "with hurdles" since Drupal 6), is to only deploy your code, and to reproduce your database (and ideally also user-uploaded files) with a custom installation profile, and also with significant help from the Features module.

The Right Way can be a deep rabbit hole, though.

Image source: SIX Nutrition.

I've been churning out quite a lot of Drupal sites over the past few years, and I must admit, the vast majority of them were deployed The Easy Way. Small sites, single developer, quick turn-around. That's usually the way it rolls. However, I've done some work that's required custom installation profiles, and I've also been trying to embrace Features more; and so, for my most recent project – despite it being "yet another small-scale, one-dev site" – I decided to go the full hog, and to build it 100% The Right™ Way, just for kicks.

Does it give me a warm fuzzy feeling, as a dev, to be able to install a perfect copy of a new site from scratch? Hell yeah. But does that warm fuzzy feeling come at a cost? Hell yeah.

Categories: Drupal News

Wunderkraut blog: 5 Tips to debug Drupal front-end with Chrome DevTools

Planet Drupal - Wed, 16/04/2014 - 4:12pm

5 of my favourite keyboard shortcuts in Chrome DevTools. I used them all the time to find bugs in JS, HTML and CSS

1. CMD + ALT + F
A global search. Search in every asset HTML,CSS and JS.  Useful when you want to check if the browser is loading the changes you are doing, or to find something in the JavaScript code to place a breakpoint. Specially useful in production, when JavaScript files are aggregated, don't try to find the code manually. Use the global search.

 

2. CMD + Z
Yes, the traditional 'undo' command. Did you know you can undo the CSS changes in DevTools?

 3. CMD + SEdit the JavaScript files inside DevTools (Source Tab). Then save the changes (CMD + S) . You will see in the console "Recompilation and update succeeded." and the background color will change.  This trick is not very useful alone. But you can use it while debugging with breakpoints.  This tip is really useful to debug on-the-fly in production sites.  

 

4. ALT + Click
This trick is awesome for severe cases of HTML divitis. Press ALT and click at the same time on the arrow, it will expand all the HTML elements under it.

5. debugger
This is not a keyboard shortcut. Place the string debugger in your JavaScript code, reload the page, and it will have the same effect than a breakpoint.

Categories: Drupal News

Modules Unraveled: 104 Developing the Acquia Certification Program with Heather James, Ben Ortega, Peter Manijak and Prasad Shirgoankar - Modules Unraveled Podcast

Planet Drupal - Wed, 16/04/2014 - 4:00pm
Published: Wed, 04/16/14Download this episodeAcquia Certification Program
  • First off, what is the Acquia Certification Program?
  • Who was involved in developing the curriculum?
  • I took a quick look, and it seems that there are four parts to the test. Are those taken individually? Or all together? (And what are the sections?)
    • Will this accurately assess front-end developers? Or Backend/Sitebuilders.
    • What about specialists?
  • How is the exam administered?
  • Where can people take the test?
  • There has been talk about certifications in the past. Some have been for it, and some have been opposed. What kind of feedback have you received so far?
Future
  • Will you be updating the program regularly? Absolutely
  • Will there be a D7 version and a D8 version? It will depend on the exam and the need s of the role we are validating
  • Should other certification programs be developed?
Questions from Twitter
  • Tanay Sai
    Any plans to launch further specialization/levels? Like for Architects, themers, Drupal PMs etc? Yest, the Front end and Back end specialist exams are on the current roadmap. Other are in pre-planning stages.
Episode Links: Certification team on TwitterWebchick’s Study GuideTanay’s Study GuideExam siteWebinar on April 23rdBen on TwitterHeather on TwitterHeather’s Personal TwitterHeather’s WebsitePrasad on TwitterPeter on TwitterEmail the Certification TeamTags: 
Categories: Drupal News

NYC Camp News & Announcements: <a href="/news/free-drupal-trainings-nyc-camp">Free Drupal trainings at NYC Camp</a>

Planet Drupal - Wed, 16/04/2014 - 2:27pm

Did you know NYC Camp has a massive list of completely free Drupal trainings scheduled for Thursday April 10th??? Check out the line-up and sign up!

Don't Forget To Register!

Make sure you create an account and register for NYC Camp 2014, Registration is completely free but the UN security is fairly strict so please register for the camp and then you can go ahead and sign up for a free training on any of the training description pages!

Categories: Drupal News

AGLOBALWAY: Redirect user after login (or filling out other forms)

Planet Drupal - Wed, 16/04/2014 - 9:50am
Redirecting a user to a specific path after a form submission is a feature required by most CMS websites. In Drupal, as with most things, there’s multiple ways to do it. Here’s a couple we use, depending on the site’s requirements:  

This is a method can be used for all the forms. Two steps here:

  1. Change block thank you page urlThis method only works for a form in a block. In admin->structure->block, find the block containing the form and there is a configuration named “Thank You Page”. Put in the redirect url here or leave blank for no redirect. The benefit of this way is both developers and the website administrator can change it without touching code while the limitation is the form must be put in a form. 
  2. Add a submit handler to form_alter
    1. Add a submit handler to the form_alter with the condition that the form id is the one we want to customize.
    2. Assign the redirect path to $form_state['redirect'] in the handler function.

 

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Categories: Drupal News

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